Google Food Delivery Orders

Google now enables users to place orders for food delivery directly through Search, Maps and Assistant. This feature has already been outlined by the Mountain View company during I / O 2018 and is now rolling it out.

Order Food With Google

Google announced in a blog post that it is “even easier” to deliver food. By that, it means partnering with delivery services like DoorDash, Postmates, Delivery.com, Slice, and ChowNow to allow users to place food orders using Search, Maps, or Assistant.

As a result, users can order food from any of them, and they won’t have to download and install an app, go to their websites, or anything along those lines to do so.

In the future, it is also working to include more businesses, such as Zuppler. But big players like Uber Eats and Grubhub do not seem to be in the mix.

Google Search And Maps

When looking for a restaurant, users should see a new “Order Online” button in Search and Maps. If it supports the new feature, they can simply tap it, decide to have it for delivery or pickup, choose a delivery service, and check it out using Google Pay.

Google Assistant

Users can let Assistant do the grunt work by saying, “Hey Google, order food from[ restaurant name].” All they need to do is choose the delivery service they want to go with and the food they want to order.

For those who want to skip all the trouble, they can simply ask the virtual assistant to repeat a previous order by saying, “Hey Google, reorder food from[ restaurant name].” They would then be able to choose from their previous orders and be done in a snap with the entire process.

This works, just to be clear, for both Android Assistant and iOS. The company, however, did not say if it would be available on smart speakers or smart displays.

It’s similar to Google’s Duplex, a service that allows users to make a restaurant reservation for them by having a voice assistant, although real people are apparently behind some of the calls.

According to the company, the new feature is now available in Search, Maps, and Assistant in “thousands of cities” in the U.S.